Tag - United Nations

Masters of disaster bring cholera to Haiti and polio to Syria

Deliver them from their rescuers …

rescuersHaiti and Syria are victims of their rescuers.  The two nations are now sites of major disease outbreaks.  Cholera in Haiti and polio in Syria didn’t just happen.   Through negligence, those who claim to rescue the people imported the disease entities and fostered the conditions for wider outbreaks.

680,000 cases of cholera in Haiti since UN rescue mission

The 7.0 Mw earthquake that devastated Haiti on January 12, 2010 collapsed an already fragile society and infrastructure.   The United States and major European powers sprung into action.  Bill Clinton was the front man for the relief effort.  The United Nations provided the vehicle to deliver much of the aid.  Welcome to the new Haiti said former president Clinton boasting of the relief effort that would transform the near failed state.  Within ten months, the vaunted relief efforts lead to a major outbreak of cholera.

The source of the outbreak was identified quickly.  UN enlisted troops from Nepal set up camp and began their work.  Someone forgot to screen the troops for cholera, a known problem in Nepal.  Prior to these arrival of these peacekeepers, Haiti had never experienced a cholera outbreak.  The recent suit for compensatory relief from the UN describes the situation elegantly:  Read More

Syria, Chemical Weapons, Ban Ki-moon, the UN – and the Real Story

The United Nations weapons inspectors report on the August 21 chemical weapons attack near Damascus has become a propaganda festival for the Western powers, including the United States.

Since the U.S. and Russia reached their deal to eliminate Syria’s chemical weapons stockpile, the report will have little impact on military action or sanctions against Syria.  Even if there is a definitive finding that the Syrian government is responsible for the attacks, the U.S. has agreed to forego any military strikes as a result of the disarmament deal. (Image)

The real story concerns the risks of calamitous military conflict erupting in the Middle East through accident or miscalculation.  More on that shortly but first, here is a quick summary of the credibility of the UN.   Read More

What President Obama Said and Didn’t Say about Syria

syrianjihadists1Wishful thinking made me hear things not said in President Obama’s Rose Garden speech on Saturday afternoon.

Said: The U.S. government has made a “powerful case” that the Syrian government was responsible for the recent chemical attacks that killed over a thousand Syrians.

Not said: The case that the Syrian government is responsible for the attacks is certain or nearly certain.

Said: I have decided the United States should take military action against Syrian regime targets.

Not said: There is legal justification for the United States to carry out a military strike on Syria at this time. Whatever laws or international agreements Syria has broken with their chemical attack provide for a military strike as a consequence.
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Shocking report details the UN’s failure to protect the people of Sri Lanka

International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect, November 16

A United Nations (UN) report alleging the failure of the international body to uphold its responsibilities to protect civilians threatened by massive human rights violations during the Sri Lankan civil war was released on 14 November 2012, and quickly spurred impassioned reactions from civil society and UN actors. For many, the Report of the Secretary-General’s Internal Review Panel on United Nations Action in Sri Lanka confirmed their earlier claims that the UN did not act rapidly or robustly to protect the people of Sri Lanka. For others, the report was a shocking reality check that the international community still has a long way to go to build the necessary political will and capacity to respond to these deadly conflicts.

The final stages of the Sri Lankan civil war, from August 2008 until May 2009, saw a dramatic escalation of violence between the Sri Lankan government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), known as the Tamil Tigers, who had been fighting to establish the state of Tamil Eelam in the north of the country since the late 1970s. Violence was concentrated in the Wanni, a northern region, and clashes trapped hundreds of thousands of civilians without access to basic necessities or humanitarian aid.

At the time, several civil society organizations, including Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International, criticized the UN for its limited efforts to hold the Sri Lankan government accountable for likely war crimes and crimes against humanity. As noted in the report, the UN evacuated its staff in the Wanni in September 2008 when the government announced it would not be able to guarantee their security, and after that was largely unable to gain access to distribute humanitarian relief aid. With the end of the war in May 2009 came widespread calls to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to investigate the perpetrators of mass atrocities and UN efforts to protect civilians.  After a Panel of Experts, established by the UNSG, reported in April 2011 that many UN agencies and officials had not done enough to protect civilians, the UNSG created the Internal Review Panel on UN actions in Sri Lanka, which is responsible for the recently released report.

de Bellaigue: Sanctions On Iran Cause Economic Strife But Are Not Working

Christopher de Bellaigue on why sanctions on Iran have thus far been, and will likely continue to be, a failure:

The assumption is that the more Iranians suffer, the more their leaders will feel the pressure and either change course or be overthrown in a popular uprising. And yet, there is no evidence to suggest that this is probable, and the Iraqi case suggests the opposite. During the U.N. blockade, Saddam was able to blame foreigners for the nation’s suffering, and ordinary Iraqis—those who might have been expected to show discontent at his misrule—grew more and more dependent on the rations he distributed. Furthermore, America’s insistence that an end to sanctions was conditional on Saddam’s departure removed any incentive he might have had to cooperate with U.N. weapons inspectors. In 1997, he stopped doing so, with the results we all know.

This time, the U.S. is at pains to show that the Islamic Republic will gain a life-saving reprieve if it falls in with U.N. resolutions calling on it to stop enriching uranium. If that happens, Hillary Clinton said in October, sanctions might be “remedied in short order.” But Iran’s supreme leader dismissed her words as a “lie.”

Khamenei and those around him believe that sanctions policy is part of a bigger American project of Iraq-style regime change. There is some logic to this; recent western tactics against Iran include sabotage, assassination and diplomatic isolation—hardly indicative of a desire for detente. The most recent round of nuclear negotiations foundered, in part, on Iran’s growing conviction that the U.S. will make no significant concession on sanctions unless Iran drastically scales down its program of uranium enrichment. That seems unlikely to happen–not simply for reasons of image and prestige, but because, as American hostility sharpens, Iran may judge its nuclear program to be the best defense it has against the fate that befell Saddam.

h/t Trita Parsi