Tag - civil war

Why Sherman was right to burn Atlanta

The New York Time’s Phil Leigh really deserves this smack-down, the kind only the war nerd Gary Brecher can provide:

There are times when the sheer ignorance and ingratitude of the American public makes you sick.

This week marks the 150th anniversary of Sherman’s March from Atlanta to the Sea, which set off on November 16, 1864—the most remarkable military campaign on the 19th century, the campaign which got Lincoln reelected, broke the back of the Confederacy, and slapped most of Dixie’s insane diehards into the realization they were defeated.

You’d think our newspaper of record, the New York Times, would find an appropriate way to mark the occasion, but the best the old Confederate-gray lady could come up with was a churlish, venomous little screed by an obscure neo-Confederate diehard named Phil Leigh. Leigh poses a stupid question: “Who Burned Atlanta?” and comes up with a stupider answer: “Sherman, that bad, bad man!”

More at the link.

Empire Project Failing in Syria Says French Foreign Minister

By Michael Collins


The survival of the Syrian government represents a major failure of the empire project to recolonize and dominate energy rich Middle Eastern and North African states.

In an abrupt change from months of anticipatory triumphalism, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius admitted that Syrian President Bashar Assad will not be leaving power any time soon.  This is a radical departure from the NATO script and that of their stenographers in the corporate media.   We’ve been fed a mix of articles over the past months predicting Assad’s imminent demise, filled with speculation on how post-Assad Syria will look after he’s gone. (Image)

Reuters reported the Fabius remarks on January 24:

“Things are not moving. The solution that we had hoped for, and by that I mean the fall of Bashar and the arrival of the [opposition] coalition to power, has not happened.”

How quickly “things” have changed.   In a July 2012 fit of grandiosity, Fabius announced that “Bashar Assad does not deserve to be on the face of the planet.” Read More

Syrian Refugees Suffer As Civil War Rages (VIDEO)

Syrian Refugees

Via IRINFILMS:

By the end of 2012, as it neared the end of its second year, the conflict between Syrian rebels and their government had killed tens of thousands of people, sent more than half a million fleeing to neighbouring countries, and left many millions more either internally displaced, unemployed or otherwise struggling to survive. More than 30,000 are now living in Za’atari refugee camp, just past the Jordanian border in harsh desert conditions. Every night, another 200 cross over. Their lives are punctuated by cold winters, basic services, and the anguish of remembering those killed or still in danger back home. Where the War Still Echoes tells the story of Leila and her family, who have recently arrived in Za’atari camp.

WATCH [AFTER THE JUMP]: Read More

Liar’s Poker – Obama and Cameron on Syrian WMD

Michael Collins
Photobucket(Washington, DC, 12/9)  Here we go again.

On, December 3, President Barack Obama warned the Syrian government against using chemical weapons against, among others, NATO-Saudi sponsored fighters trying to overthrow President Bashar Assad.

A few days later, British Prime Minister David Cameron’s foreign secretary claimed that he had evidence the Syrian government plans to use chemical weapons of mass destruction (WMD) against the rebels.

After Obama’s December 3 warning, Syria denied any intent to use the weapons “no matter what the circumstances” as they had after an earlier Obama warning.

U.S. and British government officials are unreliable sources on this subject.

Does the government of President Bashar Assad intend to use chemical WMD? Read More

Turkey: Public Support Low for Possible Fight Against Syria

by Dorian Jones

(Originally published by EurasiaNet.org, republished by permission)

The chances of a war erupting between Turkey and Syria appear to be rising. But the heated rhetoric of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s government does not seem to be matched by public enthusiasm for conflict.

The escalation in tension follows an incident October 3, when Syrian shelling killed two women and three children in the Turkish border town of Akcakale. The Turkish parliament responded on October 4 with a motion sanctioning military intervention into “foreign countries.” In the days since, Turkish artillery has been returning fire at the Syrian army.

“We have retaliated [for Syrian shelling] and if it continues, we’ll respond more strongly,” Turkish media outlets have quoted the armed forces chief of staff, Gen. Necdet Ozel, as saying.

While the Turkish Foreign Ministry has warned that “enough is enough,” opinion polls suggest a hardening and ever-increasing majority of Turks oppose armed intervention in the Syrian conflict.  Read More

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