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The Jehoshua Novels


“Red Dawn” Remake: Silliest Movie Premise Of The Year?

Yes.

 “It is silly, ridiculously silly,” says Andrei Lankov, a professor at Kookmin University in Seoul and the author of several books on North Korea. The country “has no ocean-going navy, and no air force capable of delivering troops on distances more than few hundred kilometers” nor does it have the logistics to support such an operation, he said.

…Lankov, in an e-mail, said that if the Germans made a movie about being crushed by Luxembourg, or Russians making a movie “about their country being crushed by the invading Georgian hordes, it would make a significantly more believable story line.” Even Venezuelan troops taking over the United States would make for a much more probable film, he added.

I’m awaiting the wingnut armchair battalions waxing rhapsodic about how the movie is an allegory or metaphor for all that is best about America (remember their nonsense about the movie “300″?). In fact, it’s just an example of how the movie industry is stuck in a remake rut.

Hmm, maybe there is an allegory for American gung-ho conservatism there after all.

2 comments to “Red Dawn” Remake: Silliest Movie Premise Of The Year?

  • Arnie

    One such invasion movie will never be equalled – The Mouse that Roared

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mouse_That_Roared_(film)

    starring Peter Sellers and others.

    One of the benefits of dyslexic memory (sometimes a.k.a. old age) is about the same time Peter Ustinov made a period film which memory has conflated with absolutely hilarious results, and no, shall not be sharing this one. ;>)

  • JustPlainDave

    I find the apparent motivation strangely comforting. From wiki:

    In March 2011, the Los Angeles Times reported that MGM changed the villains in its Red Dawn remake from Chinese to North Korean in order to maintain access to China’s lucrative box office. The changes reportedly cost less than $1 million and involve changing an opening sequence summarizing the story’s fictional backdrop, re-editing two scenes and using digital technology to transform many Chinese symbols to Korean. The film’s producer Trip Vinson stated, “We were initially very reluctant to make any changes, but after careful consideration we constructed a way to make a scarier, smarter and more dangerous Red Dawn that we believe improves the movie”.

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