DIA sending hundreds more spies overseas

Washington Post, By Greg Miller, December 1

The Pentagon will send hundreds of additional spies overseas as part of an ambitious plan to assemble an espionage network that rivals the CIA in size, U.S. officials said.

The project is aimed at transforming the Defense Intelligence Agency, which has been dominated for the past decade by the demands of two wars, into a spy service focused on emerging threats and more closely aligned with the CIA and elite military commando units.

When the expansion is complete, the DIA is expected to have as many as 1,600 “collectors” in positions around the world, an unprecedented total for an agency whose presence abroad numbered in the triple digits in recent years.

The total includes military attachés and others who do not work undercover. But U.S. officials said the growth will be driven over a five-year period by the deployment of a new generation of clandestine operatives. They will be trained by the CIA and often work with the U.S. Joint Special Operations Command, but they will get their spying assignments from the Department of Defense.

The article mentions that “the military isn’t subject to the same congressional notification requirements as the CIA, leading to potential oversight gaps.”

1 comment to DIA sending hundreds more spies overseas

  • Raja

    Mission Diversify: CIA Begins LGBT Recruiting

    NPR, By Greg Allen, December 2

    As part of the CIA’s efforts to diversify its workforce, the spy agency is reaching out to a group that once was unable to get security clearance — lesbians and gay men.

    Earlier this week, CIA officials held a networking event for the Miami gay community sponsored by the Miami-Dade Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce and the CIA.

    “This is the first time we’ve done a networking event of this type with any of the gay and lesbian chamber of commerces in the United States,” says Michael Barber, a self-identified “straight ally” and the spy agency’s LGBT Community Outreach and Liaison program manager.

    Over the past year, Barber and others at the agency have worked to get the word out that the CIA has changed.

    For many years, the CIA and other federal agencies routinely denied security clearances to gay men and women, until President Clinton signed an executive order ending the practice in 1995. Now, Barber says, the CIA even has a program for gay couples.

    “We actually have LGBT employees serving overseas with their partners,” Barber said to the few dozen gathered at the networking event. “So you can do it.”

Leave a Reply

Users