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Do You Pay Income Tax For Your State Of Residence Or St

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Q: What if you live in a different state from your workplace or employer? Do you pay income tax for your state of residence or state of workplace/employer? Does it matter where the work is done? I can see that it might make a difference if you work from home versus, say, driving to Kansas City, MO from Kansas every day.

A: -When we lived in Florida, I worked for a company that was based out of North Carolina. My checks were mailed to me the first year or so I worked there, and later in my employment with the company, they were direct deposited to my account. I paid no state taxes, because I lived in Florida, so I think the taxes are withheld based on the state you are a resident of. - Question: What if you live in a different state from your workplace or employer? Answer: There's an extra layer of shit on your income taxes. Question: Do you pay income tax for your state of residence or state of workplace/employer? Answer: Yes. Question: Does it matter where the work is done? Answer: Yes. Question: I can see that it might make a difference if you work from home versus, say, driving to Kansas City, MO from Kansas every day. Answer: Yes. State laws vary greatly. If you're going to be doing this between a couple states for a short period of time, get the tax forms for partial- or non-residents or out-of-state income or exemptions for taxes paid to other jurisdictions, from all of the states involved, and review them, and you'll probably be able to make sense of them. When I was working in Chicago, but moved to DC, and a few months later moved to Virginia, the taxes were an utter nightmare that year. ...But I managed to figure it out, and I only had to pay a little more in taxes than I would have ordinarially, as all of Illinois, DC, and Virginia give some sort of reciprocity where they don't make you pay taxes on something that somebody else already did. The next year, I finally got a _job_ in Virginia, and paid very little taxes in Illinois, for the same reason. Since last year, I'm down to only two sets of taxes a year (a federal, and a state) and haven't had to deal with this crap. Hopefully, that trend will continue - although if I were to change jobs, it could easily be to someplace in DC or Maryland, so I might. A friend of mine is an accountant who handles people with situations more complicated than this. Suppose you're a professional athlete: every tax jurisdiction you play in wants a piece. Think A-Rod does his own taxes? Hell no. My advice is, if you know you're going to have to fill out more than three sets of taxes, pay somebody else to deal with it. .

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